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with viewers how have you used this technology? >> sure. the iran the targeting program in u.s. africa command from 2007 to 2010. you're right we don't call them drones. we call them remotely piloted aircraft. the key there it takes 200 people to keep one of these airborne for a 24-hour orbit. it has incredible level oversight scrutiny, intelligence, lawyers, commanders watching us use the tools. there are very legitimate questions as to whether we should use lethal force in the counterterrorism strategy overseas and how is that legal and whether it is the right strategy. once you decide to use lethal force and picking a platform, the rpas give you a tremendous amount of scrutiny, oversight, persistence, per significance and flexibility to abort at the last minute if the target moves or civilians come into the area. jenna: that is why i want to mention use of language is very important. when you say drone, oh, these are things flying around the skies. >> right. jenna: one person having a cup of coffee behind directs these type of things. as you point out that is not exactly the case. let's tal
behind. and these are new technologies. they are great innovations that are coming down the pike. we need to address those. we need to move forward. i came here to talk about reasonable fiscal solutions. we just heard a debate, a good debate about the effects of sequestration. we know we have challenges. on both sides of the aisle there is a sense of purpose to change the trajectory of this debt. we are spending -- we are borrowing 40 cents of every dollar we spend. we have a national debt that is almost equal to our gross domestic product. we have interest payments that are the third-highest payment that we make here, and that's at a time of record-low interest rates. this is unsustainable, and it needs to be addressed but i think it needs to be addressed responsibly. and so, like many of you, i have my own personal passions, and they involve senior citizens, making sure that we provide them with a secure future. but also a secure future for future senio senior citizens. veterans care deeply about the condition of veterans benefits and what we're going to do to reward and thank -- truly
. these assault weapons on our streets, near schools, the only technology that should be near a child in a school should be a computer, not a gun. special those that have the magazines that only belong on the battlefield of our country and could have been purchased without criminal background checks. you have to be able to work in a bipartisan fashion to put together a coalition that can successfully pass that kind of legislation. >> but in terms of the political tactics that are not working in washington. is there something you could dow to prevent the stalling tactics. >> i would like to follow-up if i could. most people know my background and a few years back -- well, more than a few years back my cousin brian was gunned down where we grew up. aknow what it is like to have family member killed by gun violence. i think that far too many families know that feeling. there is a lot of families out there suffering from that loss. we met with some last night at a orum over in dorchester. i think if those member opposite the u.s. senate that rejected that proposal had a sense of what u.s. was like --
the door for this, but this is why i answer the way i did that i see that with the technology goings way it is and with drone technology advancing and drones getting smaller and smaller, they are not going to the the giant, big predators flying over pakistan, but little small drones to be armed with things. this is not science fiction here in terms of this is actually happening. >> booktv on location on the campus of the university of southern california at the l.a. times festival of books talking with mark mazzetti, "new york times" national security correspondent and author of this book, "the way of the knife," and, jim, you're the next caller from idaho. hi, jim. >> caller: good afternoon, gentlemen. i have a question. the la proider of servicee of to the war department in afghanistan, and i asked how the afghans were going, and i quoted him in the remark right now saying that it's basically a total failure. he went into details about that aspect of what basic means. what do you think the result is basically in afghanistan? >> well, it's obviously a question on a lot of people's mind.
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4